Vermont Marijuana News

WINOOSKI, Vt. – In Vermont, Medical marijuana reforms are turning into reality and beginning to have real impacts on Vermont patients, dispensaries, and caregivers, and the public at large. With the addition of a new dispensary in Bennington and the four new ‘satellite’ dispensary locations being opened by existing license-holders, there are already dozens of new legal medical marijuana jobs being posted and filled, with even more on the way.

Earlier this week, the Champlain Valley Dispensary (CVD) and Southern Vermont Wellness (SVW) website employment section featured over ten diverse job postings in both Burlington, Brattleboro, and the cultivation facility in Milton and presently have listings for two available job openings: a Part-Time Extraction Technician and a full-time Dispensary Manager.

Per the Vermont state regulations, applicants must be at least 21 years old and pass a criminal background check and an FBI finger print background check.

Save the Date: Meet the New England Cannabis Industry leaders May 12-13, 2018 at the Vermont Cannabis & Hemp Convention in Burlington, Vermont

According to management at the Vermont Patients Alliance (VPA),

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The war on drugs has been going on for nearly half a century, and we have a winner: marijuana. Back then, possession of pot carried heavy penalties in many states — even life imprisonment. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia sanction medical use of cannabis and eight allow recreational use. Legal weed has become about as controversial as Powerball.

One sign of the shift came in Wednesday’s debate among the Democrats running for governor of Illinois. The state didn’t get its first medical marijuana dispensary until 2015, and it decriminalized possession of small amounts of pot only last year. But most of the candidates endorsed legalization of recreational weed and one supported “full decriminalization.”

Those positions are not politically risky, in Illinois or in most places. They’re mainstream.

A 2016 Gallup poll found that 60 percent of Americans support full legalization — up from 36 percent in 2005. Given the choice, voters generally favor it. In 2016, nine states had cannabis initiatives on the ballot. Medical marijuana won in four states and recreational pot won in another

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Vermont’s handful of medical marijuana dispensaries have exclusive permission to grow and sell marijuana in the state.  If and when lawmakers legalize non-medical weed, they will likely have a head start on a very profitable industry.

From the outside, Shayne Lynn’s 2,800-square-foot building in Milton looks more like an insurance company’s headquarters than a marijuana production plant.  Inside, thousands of marijuana plants grow under artificial light. Some are secured behind glass windows, others obscured inside shipping containers.

“We’ve been here probably roughly two years in this building now,” Lynn says as he walks upstairs. “So I would say every month there’s something new going on.” 

Near a commercial kitchen, people assemble vape pens and place lozenges into packaging. Lynn’s 50 employees take cannabis from tiny clones and get it into customers’ hands.

That is how lawmakers and officials wanted it. State law allows five dispensaries to grow, process and sell medical marijuana. Each is assigned to a region, and patients have to commit to one dispensary. There is virtually no competition outside of the black market and home growing.

“That would

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BURLINGTON, Vt. — For the first time, this year’s Vermont Tech Jam will include a panel of three local Vermont cannabis entrepreneurs who will discuss the intersections between technology and cannabis at a session titled, “What’s Next for Cannabiz and Tech in Vermont?” on Saturday, October 21 at 11:00 a.m.

The Vermont Tech Jam is an annual career fair/tech expo that kicks off its 11th installment on Friday, October 20 at the Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex Junction. 

Over the course of two days, Tech Jam unfolds with three unique programming tracks for pros and job-seekers, hackerspaces, interactive panels, an awards show, and a Friday evening party featuring craft beers, a VR demo, and live tunes.

On the morning of Saturday, October 21, at 11:00am the cannabis panel, titled, “What’s Next for Cannabiz and Tech in Vermont?”, will take place in Upstairs Room A at the Champlain Valley Exposition Center.

When asked about the decision to include cannabis as a topic in this year’s Tech Jam, organizer Cathy Resmer — who is also the Associate Publisher of Seven Days, which supports

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Two resolutions proposed to the Vermont Medical Society’s annual November meeting may present an obstacle for the trend of medical and recreational cannabis legalization in Vermont.

One resolution proposes that warning labels be added to medical marijuana products and would restrict the conditions by which medical marijuana is prescribed.  Many members of the Vermont Medical Society feel that there is a lack of scientific and medical evidence to support medical marijuana as a cure or alleviation for many currently accepted conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder. “The more people label it as medical or something that’s legalized, the less wary people are going to be,” stated Dr. Geoffrey Kane, Brattleboro Retreat’s chief of addiction services.

The other resolution comes out against the push to legalize marijuana recreationally. This “really developed from a lot of physicians seeing a side from marijuana use that probably the public doesn’t see,” said Dr. David Rettew, a pediatric psychiatrist at the University of Vermont Medical Center who co-authored the proposed resolutions alongside Dr. Catherine Antley, a South Burlington-based dermatopathologist, and Dr. John Hughes, UVM’s addiction

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By Gaen Murphree

MIDDLEBURY—While lawmakers in Montpelier argue over marijuana legalization, Middlebury dairy farmers Joel Pomainville and Sam Berthiaume are readying a harvest of a cousin of marijuana — hemp — that promoters hope could be a new cash crop for Vermont farmers. “The potential is so huge on this stuff,” said Berthiaume.

Secretary of Agriculture Anson Tebbetts, who toured Pomainville and Berthiaume’s 13 acres of hemp on Monday morning, said hemp could be a supplement crop for Vermont’s dairy farmers, like maple syrup. “Some dairy farms have another cash crop like maple syrup and it adds a little bit of extra income for them,” he said. “So I’m wondering if possibly dairy farmers or other landowners could squirrel away a couple of dozen acres and be involved in this.”

Hemp Business Journal put U.S. sales of industrial hemp-based products at $688 million for 2016. The publication expects to see sales of over $1.2 billion by 2018. The raw materials fueling those sales — hemp grain, stalks, leaves and flowers — are mostly imported from other countries.

Tebbetts, Berthiaume and

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Design and branding are a pervasive influence on the way we view the world, and the industry is now having an increasing impact on the way the public views cannabis. On the frontline of imagining the future of how we decide if/how to consume, cultivate, and purchase legal cannabis, are marketing professionals who find unique challenges and enjoyment in shaping the present and future cannabis paradigm.

Some have compared this current stage of the cannabis industry’s development to the early days of the internet. “It’s a nascent industry and you can really feel the growth happening,” said Jeffrey Harkness, founder of Hark, a design firm that has worked on cannabis-related design in Vermont and in other states.

There are obvious unique variables, such as societal taboo and mixed generational or cultural attitudes, that can make designing for cannabis businesses a distinctive experience.

A lot of cannabis business challenges are NOT unique, such as identifying an audience and tailoring your message around that audience. However, there are obvious unique variables, like societal taboo and mixed generational or cultural attitudes,

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DANVERS, Mass., Oct. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — With adult-use cannabis set for a July 2018 launch in Massachusetts, many in the area are getting ready to apply for cultivation centers and dispensaries, and thousands of new cannabis employees will be needed.  While many think their home grow qualifies them to work in the cannabis industry, owners are finding those with professional training are the ones who interview better and truly understand the science behind cannabis. HempStaff, a medical marijuana recruiting and training agency, is hosting a Medical Marijuana Dispensary Agent Training Class in Danvers, Massachusetts this Oct. 21, 2017.

The class will be held at the Doubletree Boston North Shore, located at 50 Ferncroft Road, Danvers, Massachusetts. There are two sessions to choose from: 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. or 1:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. The cost is $249 with prior online registration or $300 (cash-only) at the door if seats are still available. This professional training course educates candidates on cannabis, cannabis products and the regulations in all New England states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island.

HempStaff’s four-hour course is designed to prepare participants for work in a marijuana dispensary so that business owners

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DANVERS, Mass., Oct. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — With adult-use cannabis set for a July 2018 launch in Massachusetts, many in the area are getting ready to apply for cultivation centers and dispensaries, and thousands of new cannabis employees will be needed.  While many think their home grow qualifies them to work in the cannabis industry, owners are finding those with professional training are the ones who interview better and truly understand the science behind cannabis. HempStaff, a medical marijuana recruiting and training agency, is hosting a Medical Marijuana Dispensary Agent Training Class in Danvers, Massachusetts this Oct. 21, 2017.

The class will be held at the Doubletree Boston North Shore, located at 50 Ferncroft Road, Danvers, Massachusetts. There are two sessions to choose from: 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. or 1:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. The cost is $249 with prior online registration or $300 (cash-only) at the door if seats are still available. This professional training course educates candidates on cannabis, cannabis products and the regulations in all New England states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island.

HempStaff’s four-hour course is designed to prepare participants for work in a marijuana dispensary so that business owners are getting

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Vermont Business Magazine A majority of college administrators in a new survey say that more students believe marijuana to be “safe,” drawing concern that changing attitudes about marijuana might have downstream effects on college campuses. Administrators say the number of students with marijuana-related problems has either increased (37 percent) or stayed the same (32 percent), while almost none say such problems have lessened. And while they report a variety of negative impacts of marijuana use, and acknowledge the need to address the problem, they are also dealing with gaps in information and policy. A Presidents’ Panel with the associated presentation event included University of Vermont President Tom Sullivan.

These are among the findings in a groundbreaking new survey of higher education officials by the Mary Christie Foundation and the Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy in conjunction with the National Association of System Heads (NASH). The survey of 744 professionals in academic affairs, student affairs and student health was conducted by The MassINC Polling Group and released today at a national forum on college student substance use at the University of

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