Vermont Marijuana News

When the Sioux Falls Planning Commission takes its first look at zoning regulations for medical marijuana within city limits this Wednesday, they’ll include several, following an outcry from advocates and consultants last week. 

The newly-proposed ordinance does not remove the requirement that medical cannabis dispensaries be placed 1,000 feet from “sensitive uses” such as single-family homes, twin homes or townhomes, churches, schools, daycares, public use facilities and parks.

But now it would allow prospective owners to apply for a conditional use permit, which if granted by the city council, could allow a dispensary to be built only 500 feet away from sensitive uses.

This change would allow public comment on the proposed dispensary’s plans, and would require dispensary owners to take extra steps to create a clear barrier to separate the land from other nearby areas.

Dispensaries would still need to be separated from one another by at least 1,000 feet, regardless of whether they were operating under a conditional use permit.

More: Medical marijuana advocates say Sioux Falls’ proposed rules are ‘de facto ban’ on dispensaries

The ordinance would also allow medical cannabis testing facilities, defined as a business that “analyzes the safety and potency of cannabis.”

Testing facilities would also have to be 1,000 feet from sensitive uses, and are also eligible for

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Republican lawmakers in Washington, D.C. have introduced legislation that would ban the spending of federal welfare benefits at cannabis dispensaries. Two pending pieces of legislation include language to prohibit the use of welfare benefits at marijuana retailers, including a wide-reaching Senate welfare reform bill and a stand-alone measure in the House of Representatives.

In the Senate, Republican Senator Steve Daines of Montana has included the ban in a welfare reform bill known as the “Jobs and Opportunity with Benefits and Services Act” or “JOBS Act,” (S.2381), which he introduced in the upper chamber of Congress on July 19.

The bill contains several reforms to the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, including provisions that provide job search assistance and others that require benefit recipients to work or actively seek employment. Also included in the JOBS Act is a section titled “Welfare for needs not weed,” a provision that bars the use of TANF funds at “any establishment that offers marihuana … for sale.”

“Finding and keeping a job is the best way for Montana families to go from government dependency to self-sufficiency,” Daines said in a statement on the legislation, which did not mention the cannabis provisions of the measure. “My

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Posted on: August 2, 2021, 11:29h. 

Last updated on: August 2, 2021, 11:29h.

Devin O’Connor

Las Vegas marijuana consumption lounges, places where recreational cannabis can be consumed, were legalized throughout Nevada earlier this year. 

A woman peruses the cannabis dispensary Planet 13 in Las Vegas. The venue is one of several in the Las Vegas Valley developing plans for on-site consumption. (Image: Planet 13 Las Vegas)

Nevada’s 2016 recreational marijuana law allows anyone over the age of 21 to legally purchase cannabis. But the legislation led to tourists, travelers, and even resident renters being put into a conundrum: where to consume?

The state’s recreational marijuana law permits consumption only inside privately owned residences. Using legally purchased cannabis from a recreational dispensary inside a casino, hotel room, or rental unit is illegal.

Remaining classified as an illegal Schedule 1 narcotic on the federal level, commercial casinos stay far away from anything related to the marijuana industry. Businesses and associates licensed in Nevada by the Gaming Control Board must refrain from any involvement in cannabis. 

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak (D) recognized the consumption challenge for non-residents, and signed Assembly Bill 341 in June. The law gives the state’s Cannabis

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A recent lawsuit filed against the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority (OMMA) claims that the organization did not make its meeting agenda available to the public, which violated a state law known as the Oklahoma Open Meeting Act.

The lawsuit is led by Tulsa-based attorney Ron Durbin of Durbin Law – Viridian, who spoke at a rally at the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City on July 30. “One of the main reasons I’m here today is, we filed a new lawsuit against the OMMA, against Director Williams, against her secretary, against a lot of the new members of the board of health and the food safety standard board,” Durbin said.

Approximately 100 people attended the rally, according to Fox 25. “We don’t want to do this; this is ridiculous that we have to continue to do this stuff, but if they keep forcing our hand, we’re going to keep doing it.”

Oklahoma Being Sued for “Sneaky” Rule-making

The lawsuit claims that new, emergency rules for the industry, which went into effect on July 1, were agreed upon without making the community properly aware.

The lawsuit states that the OMMA violated the Oklahoma Open Meeting Act, which requires that all state meetings (such as local boards, commissions and

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Louisiana ended the punishment of jail time for possession of small amounts of recreational cannabis, which took effect Sunday. It was one of more than 250 new laws that took effect on the same day, including new requirements for doctors administering the abortion pill and restrictions on when police officers can use chokehold restraints.

That means people in Louisiana caught with small amounts of recreational cannabis will only face a fine—with no possibility of heading to jail. The new law makes possession of up to 14 grams of pot only a misdemeanor crime carrying a fine up to $100, even for repeat offenses.

The decriminalization effort there is long overdue. Several municipalities in the Louisiana area already had switched to fines instead of arrests for possession of small amounts of cannabis.

Louisiana Progress is a partnership between two organizations—Coalition for Louisiana Progress and Louisiana Progress Action Fund. The group was created to be a powerful statewide network focusing on supporting individuals, allies, advocates, organizations and elected officials who want to move an agenda built around more just and equitable systems in the state.

“Marijuana decriminalization will truly make a difference in the lives of the people of our state,” said Peter Robins-Brown, policy &

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ATHENS — The village board is considering whether to opt in or opt out of permitting marijuana dispensaries.

Officials agreed to create a committee by the Aug. 11 meeting that would weigh the pros and cons of cannabis outlets in the village.

The move comes as communities across the Twin Counties consider the issue. The deadline to opt out is Dec. 31. If the municipality does not opt out, dispensaries would be automatically permitted in the community.

Village officials expressed diverse viewpoints on the issue.

“I don’t know if we want to opt out,” Mayor Amy Serrago said. “I have mixed feelings because the money would be good.”

Village Trustee Joshua Lipsman noted cannabis is now a legal product in New York state. Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation March 31 legalizing recreational adult-use marijuana.

But there are other issues to consider, Serrago said.

“It’s a legal product, but the traffic in the village — that’s what I worry about,” she said.

There are steps the village can take to place parameters on how dispensaries are operated in the community, village attorney Tal Rappleyea said.

“If you opt in, then you have to look at how do we mitigate those potential issues,” Rappleyea said. “What zoning would you put

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IMPERIAL — The Imperial Police Department responded to a call for service in the subdivision of Savannah Ranch in the City of Imperial regarding an armed robbery Thursday, July 29, at about 9:07 p.m., according to a press release.

It was reported that a marijuana dispensary delivery driver was robbed at gun point. When officers arrived on scene, it was determined that there were no injuries to the victim. Detectives canvased the neighborhood for additional information and video surveillance of the incident.

Police are actively investigating the case and encourage anyone with information to call (760) 355-1158. More information will be provided as it becomes available.

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A pair of Ohio lawmakers officially put their plans into action July 30 by formally filing adult-use cannabis legislation in the state’s House—the first of its kind in the state.

Democratic Reps. Casey Weinstein and Terrence Upchurch, both representing Northeast Ohio districts, first introduced their 180-page bill two weeks ago, which includes four major components: decriminalization, a cannabis excise tax, commerce and licensing, and medical cannabis.

More specifically, the Ohio Medical Marijuana Control program would remain intact, and licensed operators could pursue additional licenses to enter the adult-use market.

According to a memo Weinstein and Upchurch sent to fellow House members two weeks ago, the bill would enable municipalities to restrict the type and number of cannabis establishments operating within their jurisdictions and require the Department of Commerce to adopt rules related to the licensure of cannabis businesses. And the bill would impose restrictions on the cultivation, processing, transportation and sale of cannabis.

Also, the legislation would allow adults 21 and older to buy and possess up to 5 ounces of cannabis and grow as many as 12 plants for personal use.

“It’s time to lead Ohio forward,” Weinstein said in a joint press release issued Friday.

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On July 22, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (“LCB”) issued a notice of adoption of an interpretive statement (the “Notice”) in which the agency clarified authorized practices for marijuana processor licensees. The Notice stipulates that licensed marijuana processors cannot legally convert cannabidiol (“CBD”) into delta-9 THC because their license privileges do not allow them to manufacture THC.

Specifically, the LCB explains that:

Licensed marijuana producer may produce “marijuana” products exceeding 0.3 percent THC concentration on a dry weight basis and are authorized by statute to source “marijuana” from licensed “marijuana” producers only; The statutory language does not authorize a licensed processor to source hemp-based product, such as legally derived CBD, and convert it to delta-9 THC; The process of conversion is not an identified privilege afforded to license marijuana processors; and RCW 69.50.326 enables licensed processors to source CBD products, whether from inside or outside the regulated system, for the purpose of enhancing the CBD concentration of marijuana and marijuana products. Yet, it does not address or affirmatively authorize the use of other isomers or derivatives of marijuana as additives to marijuana and marijuana products, nor does it authorize licensed processors to process other isomers or derivatives

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