Vermont Marijuana News

Editor’s note: This commentary is by Sal Pace of Pueblo, Colorado. He is a Pueblo County Commissioner representing 165,000 residents. He previously served as a state Representative, where he was the minority leader in Colorado’s House.

I was shocked to read the June 20 commentary from one of my constituents claiming the utter end to society based on her experience in Pueblo, Colorado as the result of the end of marijuana prohibition. Let’s skip the obvious fact that Puebloans were using marijuana before adult-use was legalized overwhelmingly by Colorado and Pueblo voters in 2012. The only difference is now it’s regulated, taxed, tested and not sold from a black market dealer who probably got his product from Mexico (Donald Trump are you listening).

Let me be clear: Vermont is making the correct choice by moving to legalize, regulate and tax adult-use marijuana. Courageous leaders, like Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman, among others, will be judged well by history.

You see, the day before my constituent’s opinion piece was published in Vermont, I stood in front of the Pueblo County Courthouse and

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It was a strange week in the cannabis world. In Vermont, the House of Representatives refused to consider emergency legislation during a special session. In Nevada, all sides are still battling over distribution plans as the July 1 deadline approaches. And in Massachusetts, a compromise “repeal and replace” bill passed. Find out about that more in our weekly marijuana legislative roundup.

Vermont:

On Wednesday, the Vermont House of Representatives declined to take up a bill to legalize recreational marijuana in the state during a special veto session. The bill, which passed the Senate in a voice vote, would have allowed adults 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants at home starting in July 2018. A commission would also be created to study the social and fiscal impacts of recreational marijuana in states such as Washington and Colorado. The commission would then make recommendations as to how Vermont should proceed in implementing cannabis legalization.

The legislation included provisions to address public health and safety concerns expressed by Governor Phil Scott when

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Editor’s note: This commentary is a joint statement from the Vermont Association of Chiefs of Police, Vermont Sheriffs’ Association, Vermont Police Association and Smart Approaches to Marijuana Vermont Chapter regarding the recent marijuana legalization bill.

Members of our organizations are on the frontlines of protecting the public and especially our youth from harm, whether it is on our public highways or in our schools.

It is undisputed that marijuana use by young people under age 25 poses a risk of harm. Marijuana negatively affects developing brains, and its consequences can be serious and may be long lasting. It is also undisputed that impaired drivers due to marijuana can cause death or serious harm to others. Finally, it is also undisputed that marijuana is an addictive drug with health and social consequences to the addict, the addict’s family and our community.

As you know, Colorado recently implemented a regulated marijuana market. The governor of Colorado, Gov. John Hickenlooper, has repeatedly advised state leaders to take their time and get it right. This is the lesson of Colorado.

In our opinion, the

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BENNINGTON — For State Senator Dick Sears, Bennington’s progress in the last few years is nothing to scoff at. Sears, who has lived in Bennington for over 40 years, is the chairman of the Senate Committee on Judiciary and a vocal advocate for the state’s recent efforts to legalize cannabis. I had the chance to sit down with Senator Sears for the latest episode of Vermont Voices, to hear his thoughts on legalization, the opioid crisis, and Vermont’s use of private prisons.

“We’ve had our ups and downs in Bennington County, but I think that by and large we’re moving forward,” said Sears. “Yes, we’ve had our trials and tribulations, but I think overall if you look at what we’ve done and where we’re at I think things are better.”

Among the challenges our state faces is the national opioid epidemic, which has had a tremendous impact on the communities in Bennington County.

“Keeping a heroin addiction alive is very difficult, and we’ve seen the number of overdose deaths increase dramatically, particularly with fentanyl use,” said Sears. “One thing we’ve done, here

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After marijuana legalization comes up short this year, Vermont and Rhode Island will both have study commissions to examine the issue, Nevada’s governor finds a way to get recreational sales going next week, Cuba says no to legal weed, and more.

Marijuana Policy

Study Finds No Increase in Traffic Fatalities After Marijuana Legalization. A study published Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health finds that vehicle crash fatality rates in Colorado and Washington were similar to those of control states both before and after the two states legalized marijuana. The study concluded: “Three years after recreational marijuana legalization, changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates for Washington and Colorado were not statistically different from those in similar states without recreational marijuana legalization.” (Another study was reported the previous day, which by contrast found increased collision claims.)

Massachusetts Legislature Names Conference Committee to Hammer Out Differences on Marijuana Bill. Legislative leaders on Friday named a six-member House-Senate conference committee to try to come up with a compromise bill to implement voter-approved marijuana legalization after the House formally rejected the

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LOS ANGELES –

Chef Andrea Drummer is taking fine dining to new heights.

“The heating of the THC is what activates it,” she said.

Drummer is a cannabis chef. She infuses her food with THC, the chemical compound in marijuana that gives a euphoric high.

Asked if people get uncomfortably high, Drummer said, “No. For me, I believe in proper dosing and responsible dosing so I often do microdosing, which is very small levels of THC.”

Drummer hosts exclusive pop-up dinners in southern California. The classically trained chef goes beyond baked goods and candy and creates a more sophisticated experience with her custom strains of oil and butter.

Drummer’s company, Elevation VIP, is a medical marijuana dispensary. It allows her to glaze quail confit with cannabis blueberry barbecue sauce and serve up forbidden rice.

But not everyone can join the party. You need a medical marijuana license to enjoy this type of meal.

California legalized recreational marijuana last year, so only the host needs a license. But Drummer says she makes sure all her diners are licensed. She’s been entertaining

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After pot legalization comes up short this year, Vermont and Rhode Island will both have study commissions to examine the issue, Nevada’s governor finds a way to get recreational pot sales going next week, Cuba says no to legal weed, and more.

Marijuana Policy

Study Finds No Increase in Traffic Fatalities After Pot Legalization. A study published Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health finds that vehicle crash fatality rates in Colorado and Washington were similar to those of control states both before and after the two states legalized marijuana. The study concluded: “Three years after recreational marijuana legalization, changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates for Washington and Colorado were not statistically different from those in similar states without recreational marijuana legalization.”

Massachusetts Legislature Names Conference Committee to Hammer Out Differences on Marijuana Bill. Legislative leaders on Friday named a six-member House-Senate conference committee to try to come up with a compromise bill to implement voter-approved marijuana legalization after the House formally rejected the Senate’s version of the bill. The House version had higher taxes and allowed

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LOS ANGELES –

“He was a beautiful soul,” Lonnie Britton said.

Britton couldn’t hold back the tears. Last year, a Colorado teen was sentenced for killing Britton’s 16-year-old son. The teen smoked marijuana before he plowed into Chad Britton.

“The worst thing that could have happened to the state of Colorado was passing the marijuana law,” Lonnie Britton said.

A new joint study released by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and Highway Loss Data Institute shows some concerning numbers that may link legalized recreational marijuana and increased risk of crashes. The research examined crash data in three of the first states to make pot legal.

“The big takeaway is that legalizing recreational use of marijuana in Colorado, Washington and Oregon has… not been good for highway safety,” said Matt Moore of the Highway Loss Data Institute.

Insurance date on collision claims showed Colorado had 14 percent more crashes compared to surrounding western states, Washington had a 6 percent increase and Oregon was 4.5 percent higher.

Those statistics could lead to higher premiums for drivers in states with legalized recreational

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Posted on June 22, 2017 |
By Angelo Lynn

The possession of small of amounts of marijuana and its use will soon be legal in Vermont. That certainly became a reality on Wednesday when the Vermont Senate and Gov. Scott agreed on a compromise bill that would make possession of small amounts of marijuana legal for adults, while establishing a commission to study how the state could best regulate and tax the sale of marijuana for adult use. 

But there’s a caveat. While the revised bill received the Senate’s endorsement as well as Gov. Scott’s, it is unlikely that House Republicans will agree to suspend the rules (which takes a three-quarters vote) and approve the measure during the veto session this Thursday. If the House fails to act this week, the measure will be brought up for a House vote when the Legislature reconvenes next January, at which point approval is expected. 

In short, it is no longer a question of whether the bill will be approved, but when. 

As written, the measure would eliminate Vermont’s civil penalty for adults possessing

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